Stephanie Druley

Druley knows reporting is sometimes more than who had the best play of the game. She took a leadership role over the past year in the training for how the company reports on rape, sexual assault and domestic violence. She’s also pleased that ESPN is looking different these days. “I am proud of the steps we at ESPN have taken that have put women in traditionally male on-camera roles. Doris Burke is a full-time NBA color analyst. Beth Mowins was the first woman to call a Monday Night Football game. And, our NFL studio shows are hosted by women,” she says.

Do you see any potential backlash to the Me Too/Time’s Up movements?
The movement has been a huge step for women in the workplace and is long overdue. I hope that it does not close the door of opportunity for women. Overly cautious behavior could lead to lack of inclusion for women. It is essential that we maintain healthy professional relationships for the benefit of the overall organization.

What’s a recent example of a step forward for women in the media industry?
I am proud of the steps we at ESPN have taken that have put women in traditionally male on-camera roles. Doris Burke is a full-time NBA color analyst. Beth Mowins was the first woman to call a Monday Night Football game. And, our NFL studio shows are hosted by women.

Who is an inspirational woman you admire, and why?
For 23 years as ESPN’s CFO, Christine Driessen has been an advocate for women at our company. She was passionate about women having a voice and a seat at the table. She was a trusted advisor for many of us. I personally owe her a huge thank you.

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