Cable360AM — News briefing for Thursday, Nov. 29 »

The Dallas Cowboys host the Green Bay Packers tonight, but Cable360 staffers won’t be watching the game because our local cable operator doesn’t carry the NFL Network. Actually, that’s not true. We wouldn’t be watching the game anyway—it would conflict with our Gamblers Anonymous meeting. Good morning.

Discovery Communications president and CEO David Zaslav predicted at the Reuters Media Summit in New York that his company’s soon-to-launch Planet Green channel will reach 70 million homes within three years of its launch. Advertisers for the channel are expected to be those trying to reach consumers who want to lead more environment-friendly lives—and who have the buying power to do so. [Reuters]

Jane Root is leaving her post as president and general manager of the Discovery Channel and Science Channel in the U.S. and is returning to the U.K.. Discovery Communications veteran John Ford, head of Discovery Times (which will be rechristened Investigation Discovery) and the Military Channel, will take her place. The Guardian Unlimited speculates that Root may become controller of BBC1. [Guardian Unlimited]

FCC chairman Kevin Martin proposed yesterday that the commission adopt a rule that would restrict the growth of the largest cable operator in the U.S., the New York Times reports. [New York Times]

Shares of cable stocks are expected to keep gaining in value in the wake of FCC chairman Kevin Martin’s recent failed attempt to expand the commission’s regulatory powers over cable operators, Bloomberg.com reports. Among Martin’s goals was the establishment of an arbitration process that would resolve disputes between operators and programmers, such as the one between the top cable companies and NFL Network. [Bloomberg.com]

Enforcing federal arbitration between powerful corporate entities like the top cable operators and the NFL is absurd, says the Small Business Times. It’s not like anyone’s life and liberty are at stake. Let the market work it out, the paper says. [Small Business Times]

Entertainment conglomerate CEOs have remained relatively silent during the current writers strike, according to the Hollywood Reporter. This may be part of a strategy to redirect the attention of Wall Street investors. [Hollywood Reporter]

AT&T launched its High Speed Downlink Packet Access (HSDPA) wireless broadband network in the Twin Cities, which will give customers there much faster Internet access than the company’s older EDGE network. Some AT&T customers will be able to send and receive live video, depending on the handsets they’re using. Apple’s iPhone is still confined to AT&T’s slower EDGE network. [TwinCities.com]

DirecTV now offers local HD programming in Flint, Mich., making it the 67th city in which the satellite distributor provides the service.

Time Warner Cable promoted Melinda Witmer to EVP and chief programming officer from SVP and chief programming officer.

Today in CableFAX Daily: Capitol Hill is disturbed with the imperious activities of FCC chief Kevin Martin.


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