Lauren Wallace

Wallace helped lead Layer3 TV’s launch and expansion of its television service in five markets in 2017 along with the company’s acquisition by T-Mobile. “Building a new cable television company … required my team to swiftly master an understanding of the legal and regulatory landscape governing not just traditional content distribution, but mercurial rules in the new media space,” she says. Wallace assisted with that by creating Layer3 TV’s “Breakfast and Learn” mentoring sessions. A team player, she also designed a summer associate intern program for local law students, some of whom have joined her department. She’s guided by her past work at DISH, where she played a key role in the launch of Sling TV.

What have been the most important legal issues in communications for you in the past year?
I think all legal issues are assessments of business risks, but building a new cable television company in 2018 required my team to swiftly master an understanding of the legal and regulatory landscape governing not just traditional content distribution, but mercurial rules in the new media space.

How is today’s political environment impacting your job and the industry?
The current political environment sparked a flurry of mergers and acquisitions in the telecommunications and media industries this year and the trend of big telecom companies buying media companies is likely to continue in the current climate. A shrinking number of players in these industries will impact industry dynamics, day-to-day dealings and customers. Here lies the opportunity for a disruptive company like Layer3 TV to accelerate its efforts to delight the customer at every touch point and deliver on our promise to put customers first.

What is your golden rule for negotiating?
Listen and learn. Knowing your business and the broader media landscape is the absolute best and most effective way to advocate any position.

What’s the biggest sleeper issue in communications?
OTT services still leave consumers struggling to cobble together the content they want for lower than traditional pay television because the most valuable programming remains subsidized by the bundle.

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