Miranda Technologies Inc., a Canadian provider of  infrastructure, playout and monitoring systems, plans to unveil new end-to-end loudness monitoring, logging and?correction solutions for both automatic, real-time processing during? playout and file-based pre-processing prior to air at next week’s NAB 2012 in Las Vegas.??

Three new loudness-related advancements include segment-aware loudness monitoring and logging to the Kaleido series multiviewers and the real-time loudness-correction processors. Using Miranda’s iControl system, operators reportedly can log the average loudness per segment, in turn generating a detailed report that addresses loudness control regulations around the world, including the CALM Act.?

Second, operators now can monitor and correct content prior to playout using Miranda’s Enterprise Suite, a file-based processing solution that provides loudness correction while maintaining the full dynamic range of the original content.??

Finally, Miranda is introducing Intelligent Automatic Loudness Correction that helps operators avoid audio-quality problems associated with “the unnecessary processing of content that has already been through loudness correction,” the company says. Here’s how it works:  Through integration between Miranda’s file-based and real-time loudness correction solutions, customers can automatically turn loudness correction on or off. For? example, if a commercial has already been processed using file-based loudness correction, Miranda’s real-time processor will detect that this content already had been corrected and will turn off the automatic loudness correction.

According to Marco Lopez, senior vice president/Infrastructure, Routers and? Monitoring, “Loudness control is not just about compliance, it’s also about preventing viewers from reaching for their remotes to adjust the volume. As everyone is all too aware, that remote can also tune the television to a competitor’s channel."

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