A proud resident’s tour proves that CTAM’s `New World’ can easily coexist with Boston’s old-world atmosphere. By Stephen Warley We know you’re going to be busy at Summit, but if you can spare a bit of time there are several ways to squeeze genuine slices of Bostonian life into your jammed-packed CTAM plans. The tourist spots are obvious—and good. A tour of Fenway Park is a must, the Freedom Trail wends its way past most of the town’s historical attractions and the Prudential Center offers the city’s best panoramic views. But why not go where the locals go? There are plenty of Starbucks in and around the Summit’s site at the Hynes Convention Center, but a better bet is the Boston Coffee Exchange, near Boston Common, which has the widest selection of coffee in the city (32 Summer St., opposite Macy’s, 617-737-3199). The shop is very small, so get your coffee to go. For a breakfast meeting consider Mike’s City Diner in the South End, the neighborhood just behind the Convention Center (1714 Washington St., 617-267-9393). This cozy eatery offers a step back in time and features heaping portions, bottomless cups of coffee and black-and-white checkered tablecloths. For lunch, if you can manage to escape the Convention Center, you’ll find a variety of eateries a stone’s throw away along Boylston and Newbury Streets. Swing by the Parish Caf� to sample two dining experiences rolled into one (361 Boylston St., 617-247-4777). Pick from a selection of gourmet sandwiches designed by local chefs like the cholesterol-busting Summer Shack, a beer-battered, pan-fried haddock concoction, or The Icarus, a sliced pork affair. If you’re pressed for time, grab a slice at the Upper Crust (222 Newbury St., 617-262-0090). Its offerings are more gourmet than the more authentic slices of the North End. A full day of panels and meetings is enough to make anyone want a quick nap before dinner. However, there are many other ways to unwind in Boston. Try a facial or manicure at G2O Spa by Giuliano, conveniently located near the major downtown hotels (338 Newbury St., 617-262-2200); 90-minute Swedish and deep-tissue massages are also available for men and women ($120). Maybe you need some exertion to release the tension. Unleash yourself on the Minute Man Trail, the 11-mile route American soldiers took from Boston to Lexington in 1775 at the start of the Revolutionary War (www.minutemanbikeway.org). You can run, rollerblade, bike or just take a quiet stroll as you collect your thoughts. Pick up the trail near the Alewife or Davis Square T (short for MBTA) stations on the Red Line. Take the inbound T on the Green Line from the Convention Center stop and transfer at Park Street to the outbound Red Line. For great scenery, head up Massachusetts Avenue from the Convention Center and walk over the Harvard Bridge to Cambridge for some of the most spectacular views of Boston at ground level. At night you can see the Zakim Bunker Hill Bridge cast in purple light, all of Boston’s skyscrapers and the glow of Fenway Park, since the Sox will be playing at home while you’re in town. The Charles River is among the iconic Boston sights. During the day, as it’s dotted with sailboats and rowers, you’ll see why. If you continue 2 miles along Massachusetts Avenue into Cambridge, take a tour of the Longfellow House (www.longfellowfriends.org). You can also take the outbound Red Line T to Harvard Square. Built by a Royalist in 1759, the house served as Washington’s headquarters during the siege of Boston in 1775-76. Named for its longtime occupant, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, the house was the renowned poet’s home from 1837-1882. Among those he hosted there were Ralph Waldo Emerson, Nathaniel Hawthorne and Charles Dickens. As itinerant shoppers dive in and out of stores along Newbury Street, pay a visit to the newly opened Johnny Cupcakes, the T-shirt shop designed like a bakery (279 Newbury St., 781-925-0700). Refrigerators and deli coolers double as display cases. Donned in an apron, baby-faced Johnny serves tees from behind a counter for upwards of $55. For the budget conscious note that NewburyOpen.net makes Wi-Fi access available free at several cafes along this famed shopping thoroughfare. Cafes within walking distance of the Convention Center include Virgin Records Cafe, Trident Booksellers and Sonsie. After the Red Sox, Bostonians’ favorite indulgence is ice cream. Enjoy an old New England favorite, a scoop of black raspberry on a sugar cone, at J.P. Licks (352 Newbury St., 617-236-1666). For more exotic flavors like khulfee or green tea ice cream head to Toscanini’s (84 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, 617-496-1556). Since a vital part of Summit is catching up with old colleagues, hop on the T on the outbound Red Line to Davis Square in Somerville. Gorge on ribs at the infamous RedBones; look for the old red truck outside (55 Chester St., Somerville, 617-628-2200). Then take in a few games of candlepin bowling at Sacco’s Bowl Haven (45 Day St., Somerville 617-776-0552). For a less athletic endeavor enjoy a pint at The Burren as you listen to some of the most authentic Irish music in town. The cover charge typically is a mere $5 (247 Elm St., Somerville, 617-776-6896). There’s probably not a better place to enjoy a glass of wine on a summer evening than at the Navy Yard Bistro (1 1st Ave., Charlestown, 617-242-0036). Located within sight of the USS Constitution at the Navy Yard along Boston Harbor, a taxi is your best bet to get there. If you are looking for more of a scene, spend an evening in the clink at Cuffs, the hotel bar at Jurys (350 Stuart St., 617-266-7200). The hotel is the site of the former Boston Police Headquarters. Combining CTAM’s "New World" with Boston’s old-world atmosphere should help you reach your own personal summit. Enjoy! Stephen Warley is executive director of digital media at 602 Communications. He lives in the Boston suburb of Medford.

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