The Hybrid Broadcast Broadband TV (HbbTV) Consortium just published Version 1.5 of its hybrid-TV specification, and it introduces support for HTTP adaptive streaming based on the recently published MPEG-DASH specification, potentially improving the perceived quality of video presentation on busy or slow Internet connections.

The spec also enables content providers to protect DASH-delivered content with potentially multiple DRM technologies based on the MPEG CENC spec, improving efficiency in markets where more than one DRM technology will be used, the group says.

Notes HbbTV Chairman Klaus Illgner-Fehns, “The publication of version 1.5 of the HbbTV specification responds to strong market demand for new features to be included as soon as possible. We are already working towards version 2.0 of the specification.”

Here’s more: “Version 1.5 significantly enhances access to broadcast TV schedule information, enabling operators to produce full seven-day electronic program guides as HbbTV applications that can be deployed across all HbbTV receivers to provide a consistent user experience,” the consortium says. “The latest advances are based on activity within the HD Forum in France as part of the development of the TNT 2.0 specification.” ? ?

The HbbTV Consortium is nearly a year old and now has more than 60 members. Four new Steering Group members were elected at the consortium’s first AGM to provide further representation from across the industry: Abertis Telecom, Digital TV Labs, Opera Software and RTL Group. Other Steering Group representatives include ANT Software Limited, EBU, France Televisions, Institut für Rundfunktechnik GmbH, NAGRA, Samsung, SES ASTRA S.A, Sony Corporation, Television Francaise 1 – TF1 and TP Vision.

Next month, the consortium will host its 10th interoperability workshop in Munich.

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