Cable360AM — News briefing for Friday, Jan. 18 »

Members of the Cable360 news staff are readying themselves for intense trash talking Sunday during the NFL championship games. Good morning.

The NY Times says yesterday’s agreement between the Directors Guild of America and Alliance of Motion Picture and Television Producers sends "a none-too-subtle message" to striking writers: “This is not the time to get hung up on new media.” The agreement, which raises minimum compensation rates and delivers other gains for the directors, reflects the belief, The Times says, that digital media will provide little revenue during the life of the contract. The directors feel digital media revenues will become significant only after 2010. The pact puts pressure on the writers, The Wall Street Journal says. The writers, on strike for 11 weeks, say they will review the directors’ agreement. [NY Times] [WSJ] [Read The Directors Guild of America’s press release announcing its agreement.]

A prominent Wall Street watcher scotched the idea advanced by Chieftain Capital Management of ousting Comcast CEO Brian Roberts. Merrill Lynch’s Jessica Reif Cohen wrote, "We disagree with the surprising call for the replacement of” Roberts. Comcast shares closed at  $17.41, down 77 cents. [The NY Post]

The controversy surrounding The Golf Channel’s Kelly Tilghman and her unfortunate choice of words two weeks ago continues, as Golfweek magazine’s cover shows a noose with the words: “Tilghman Slips Up, and Golf Channel can’t wriggle free.” The magazine did a special report on the incident. The Golf Channel announcer said that the only way for young players to stop Tiger Woods is to “lynch him in a back alley.” Tilghman, who subsequently apologized, was suspended for two weeks.
[The NY Times] [Golfweek]

Briefly Noted
Deadwood and John From Cincinnati creator David Milch and HBO are back in business with Last of the Ninth, an NYPD-based drama set in 1972, The Hollywood Reporter says. The former college professor knows his police dramas, as he co-created NYPD Blue and got his Hollywood start on Hill St Blues. [The Hollywood Reporter]

Papers across the country today scribbled about Google’s philanthropy, a mix of for and non-profit giving. Google’s $2 billion set aside for good-doing, make it the largest in-house corporate foundation in the country. [The Wall Street Journal]

The NY Times details the deal that has EVP Michael Hirschorn leaving VH-1 to start a new company that will  have close ties to MTV Nets. [The NY Times]

AMC’s newest foray into scripted drama, Breaking Bad (premieres Sun, 10pm), receives a mixed review from The Times. [The NY Times]

Ah, the power of the media. ESPNRadio’s Mike & Mike In the Morning show, simulcast on ESPN2 and ESPN2HD, noted earlier in the week that NY Giants’ QB Eli Manning would be unable to watch his favorite show, Seinfeld, Saturday evening in Green Bay, Wisconsin, as the local affiliate had decided to temporarily pull the show, making life less comfortable for the rival team’s star. Sony chief Sir Howard Stringer, a loyal Mike & Mike listener and a Giants’ fan, has sent a boxed set of the complete Seinfeld series to Manning. Here’s hoping the Giants’ team hotel has a disc player available.

Editor’s Note:  In observance of Martin Luther King Day, Cable360 will not perform extensive updating of this site until Tuesday, January 22.
Yesterday’s 360AM 

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